What is a good guitar for an intermediate player?

What do you think are good guitar for someone who is an intermediate guitar player? I play alternative rock, hard rock, ambient, and metal. Generally I would look for suggestions in the 0 – 0 price range.

I’ve already looked into saving up for the Schecter Damien Elite FR, Fender MIM Strat, Faded Gibson SG Special, Ibanez RG4EXMI, and a couple others.

Chosen Answer:

Here’s 7 reasons why to agree on a Gibson.

1. Many people say that Gibson guitars are some of the most beautifully crafted guitars in the world. This is, of course, a matter or personal preference but you cannot deny the beauty of a Les Paul.

2. Les Paul. This Jazz Guitarist/Inventor pioneered the manufacturing of electric guitars. He is now recognized as a household name because of his signature guitar which bears his name.

3. Jimmy Hendrix played a Gibson guitar. That’s right. The guitar hero who is basically synonymous with the Fender Stratocaster played Gibson guitars before he played a Strat. Some of the notable models that Hendrix used were the SG Custom, the Flying V, the Les Paul Special and the Les Paul Custom.

4. Humbucker pickups. Generally described as being “warm, thick, or rich,” these pickups give a gorgeous sound. Humbucker pickups are present on most Gibson guitars. Without getting too technical they cut out destructive interference and increase constructive interference which makes for a beautiful sound-to noise-ratio. Don’t get it? Just go play one. You’ll understand!

5. Fat Necks. Gibsons have notoriously fat necks. Some people like them and others don’t. It is really a matter of personal preference and this author likes them! That’s why they are in the “reasons to buy” section.

6. Resale Value. Gibson guitars are well-made. You can count on getting your money back for one if you ever decide to part with it. In fact, depending on how you treat it, it might actually appreciate in value.

7. If that’s not enough for you, here is a list of some guitar players who have chosen Gibson guitars: Slash, Duane Allman, Jeff Beck, Buckethead, B.B. King, and Pat Metheny.
by: Born2Stunt
on: 13th August 11

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7 Responses to What is a good guitar for an intermediate player?

  1. Steven says:

    GIBSON SG!

  2. Born2Stunt says:

    Here’s 7 reasons why to agree on a Gibson.

    1. Many people say that Gibson guitars are some of the most beautifully crafted guitars in the world. This is, of course, a matter or personal preference but you cannot deny the beauty of a Les Paul.

    2. Les Paul. This Jazz Guitarist/Inventor pioneered the manufacturing of electric guitars. He is now recognized as a household name because of his signature guitar which bears his name.

    3. Jimmy Hendrix played a Gibson guitar. That’s right. The guitar hero who is basically synonymous with the Fender Stratocaster played Gibson guitars before he played a Strat. Some of the notable models that Hendrix used were the SG Custom, the Flying V, the Les Paul Special and the Les Paul Custom.

    4. Humbucker pickups. Generally described as being “warm, thick, or rich,” these pickups give a gorgeous sound. Humbucker pickups are present on most Gibson guitars. Without getting too technical they cut out destructive interference and increase constructive interference which makes for a beautiful sound-to noise-ratio. Don’t get it? Just go play one. You’ll understand!

    5. Fat Necks. Gibsons have notoriously fat necks. Some people like them and others don’t. It is really a matter of personal preference and this author likes them! That’s why they are in the “reasons to buy” section.

    6. Resale Value. Gibson guitars are well-made. You can count on getting your money back for one if you ever decide to part with it. In fact, depending on how you treat it, it might actually appreciate in value.

    7. If that’s not enough for you, here is a list of some guitar players who have chosen Gibson guitars: Slash, Duane Allman, Jeff Beck, Buckethead, B.B. King, and Pat Metheny.

  3. Ignatius27 says:

    Here’s 7 Reasons why you may not want to get a Gibson:

    1. For a new guitar, they are ridiculously overpriced. You are not going to find a new Gibson Les Paul, SG, Flying V or other model for less than $1000.00 new.
    2. For a used guitar, Gibsons are still expensive, but if you find a good Gibson that hasn’t been messed with (electronics, neck, pickups) you might pay $500-700.00.
    3. Fat necks are for people with big hands. If you have small fingers but big palms, like me, you are better off playing a Fender Stratocaster.
    4. There are a lot of great guitarists who played Gibson, but the list of Fender Strat players is just as long: Mark Knopfler, Keith Richards, The Edge, Jeff Beck, and yes, Jimi Hendrix. Bruce Springsteen plays a Fender Telecaster.
    5. The famous sustain that people used to get on the Les Paul can be replicated with active electronic pedals now.
    6. Gibson guitars are NOTORIOUSLY heavy. Not everyone wants to go around getting a sore neck by just carrying around the Les Paul for a few sets. Fender guitars are LIGHT.
    7. At your price range, there are plenty of other good guitars to try out: Ibanez, Fender Squire, B.C. Rich, Epiphone. Bottom line: If you can only spend around $700.00 for a new guitar, everything you can afford will be made in Japan or China anyway. They are all decent guitars, but if you want the biggest bang for your buck, save up for that $1200.00 Rickenbacker, made in Germany, which will last for a lifetime and will sound like a million bucks. Good luck!

  4. Eyebrows says:

    Play what you play well. Try out different guitars. Brian May of Queen played the same guitar his whole life; one that he built himself. Ask yourself what a good guitar is. If you like it, get it.

    Personally, I like PRS.

  5. Travis Chuning says:

    personally i can tell you PRS or Agile are good choices for metal i suggest the schecter or a good agile both are great guitar companies with excellent instruments

  6. jimmy j says:

    For intermediate, you’ll want something with maximum playability and versatility. The Les Paul is physically too heavy, and the SG Faded Special has too chunky a neck.

    Look into a Fender Mexican Standard HSS Strat … you need the humbucker in the bridge if you want to play metal. Like this:

    http://www.altomusic.com/shop/Fender-Mexican-Standard-HSS-Strat-in-Brown-Sunburst_pid111647.am

    Rather than Ibanez, I’d recommend the ESP LTD MH-1000NT or MH-350NT. They use real Duncans or EMGs instead of generic stock ones.

    http://www.americanmusical.com/Item–i-ESP-MH1000NT-LIST
    http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/esp-ltd-mh-350nt-electric-guitar

    Of all the above, the HSS Strat and MH-1000NT are my top picks.

  7. Norm Jones says:

    Hello there,

    Any intermediate guitar player should know enough about guitars to realize there are basic features that he or she must decide upon.

    These are quite different guitars. Some have 25 1/2 inch scale others have a 24 3/4 inch scale. The SG has a rounded profile that gives the neck a thick feel (better for sustain). The Strat has a modern C profile that gives the neck a thin feel. I think the Strat has a fretboard radius of 9 1/2 inches. Not sure of the radius on the SG. I believe that Ibanez has a compound radius. Not sure about the Schecter. The bodiy shape and weight will vary greatly. The balance is quite different in these guitars. Some have a tremolo bridge and have a fixed bridge. Some have single coil pickups and some have humbuckers. So these guitars will sound very much different.

    Let’s see, you have not decided upon a scale length, body shape, neck profile, pickups or a bridge type. If you cannot decide on the basic factors of a guitar, how can anyone else help. All we can say is that we prefer playing one or the other because we like how it feels and how it sounds. That does not mean you will fiind it comfortable to play, nor that you will like the sound.

    You need to go test both and decide on the basic features of the guitar. Looking at pictures is a poor way to select a guitar.

    Later,

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