What is a good guitar for a beginner?

OK. Well I am going to be getting a guitar in a couple of months and I have my ? set on a Yamaha. It is an Acoustic and it is 0. But I need to know from some people that have had experience and let me know if it is a good deal, good guitar, etc. And also if there is a better one. If I get that guitar it is as Bills Music Shop in MD.. PLEASE HELP!

Chosen Answer:

The perfect guitar for you is the one that you can’t put down after you get it in your hands. The relationship you have with your guitar will define how much you practice and how much you progress. You have to absolutely love the feel of it, the sound of it, and even the way it looks. I own a few Yamahas and they are fine guitars. The advice about looking online for price comparisons is good, but the bottom line is:

Find the perfect guitar for you.

Remember the following guidelines:

1. We only practice on days that end with a “Y”

2. Everytime you meet someone who knows more than you, politely bother them until they teach you one thing. When people start bothering you, remember that you did the same thing and take pride in the fact that they now consider you a player and someone worth bothering!

3. Your guitar is not a Hi – Bye friend. You have a relationship with your guitar and it requires time and effort on your part to make it work. If you start to resent that relationship, then redefine it, or end it. The guitar may not be right for you and something else may be, but don’t continue out of duty or guilt.

4. Practice makes permanent. I have students who practice songs over and over again, and they are practicing the same mistakes – you guessed it – over and over again. When it is time for them to play, they ply – mistakes. Slow down, play it right, get help if you need it, and always strive for perfection over speed. Speed will come when your hand to eye coordination develops enough to allow you to trust your kinesthetic memory (muscle memory) but it only takes three days to develop a bad habit and over a month to break it. Don’t learn bad habits. It’s too easy to do it and too hard to undo it sometimes.

5. Learn to read notation. Notation is the language of music and it allows you to communicate freely with other musicians. I am not putting down tablature here. Tablature has a a rich, deep history and it is the Grandfather of notation, but it is also specific to the instrument you are playing. Tablature will not help you to talk to pianists, horn players, or even drummers. Tablature will not tell you how long to leave your finger on a string, or what to do with it while it’s down there. Tablature just tells you where to put your finger. It is a great graphic aid, but it is not complete within itself. Learn to read the notes. It is much easier than it seems at first.

Best of luck no matter what you decide and I hope this helps.
by: MUDD
on: 28th March 08

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5 Responses to What is a good guitar for a beginner?

  1. Josh S says:

    fender strat?

  2. Intell says:

    Any guitar it doesnt matter which one you get if you’re a beginner

  3. vixsta33 says:

    I agree-Fenders are excellent guitars for pro’s and beginners. Even their Squire range is really good and very reasonable. However, Yamaha’s are not too bad at all! I worked in a guitar shop many years ago-but I’m just offering advice from what I knew back then.

  4. BUD LT says:

    Fender and Yamaha are great guitars. They both make guitars for beginners and professionals. As far a price goes, I would say that is a reasonable price. I would check it against MUSICIANSFRIEND.COM and just see if it is pretty close. My first choice would be a Fender, but Yamaha makes some pretty good guitars too and at the price level your dealing with….either would be ok. Here is one important thing I look for in a beginning guitar. The tuning keys must be machined and not worm gear drivin. If you dont understand that, ask the music store to explain it. If your going to pursue a classical style of music, you will need a nylon string classical guitar. If your going to rock out with Jewel and Dave Mathews, then you will need to buy a steel string standard guitar. I love these questions because I play guitar, piano, violin and bass. I taught myself how to play and music brings me great joy.

  5. cconsaul says:

    The perfect guitar for you is the one that you can’t put down after you get it in your hands. The relationship you have with your guitar will define how much you practice and how much you progress. You have to absolutely love the feel of it, the sound of it, and even the way it looks. I own a few Yamahas and they are fine guitars. The advice about looking online for price comparisons is good, but the bottom line is:

    Find the perfect guitar for you.

    Remember the following guidelines:

    1. We only practice on days that end with a “Y”

    2. Everytime you meet someone who knows more than you, politely bother them until they teach you one thing. When people start bothering you, remember that you did the same thing and take pride in the fact that they now consider you a player and someone worth bothering!

    3. Your guitar is not a Hi – Bye friend. You have a relationship with your guitar and it requires time and effort on your part to make it work. If you start to resent that relationship, then redefine it, or end it. The guitar may not be right for you and something else may be, but don’t continue out of duty or guilt.

    4. Practice makes permanent. I have students who practice songs over and over again, and they are practicing the same mistakes – you guessed it – over and over again. When it is time for them to play, they ply – mistakes. Slow down, play it right, get help if you need it, and always strive for perfection over speed. Speed will come when your hand to eye coordination develops enough to allow you to trust your kinesthetic memory (muscle memory) but it only takes three days to develop a bad habit and over a month to break it. Don’t learn bad habits. It’s too easy to do it and too hard to undo it sometimes.

    5. Learn to read notation. Notation is the language of music and it allows you to communicate freely with other musicians. I am not putting down tablature here. Tablature has a a rich, deep history and it is the Grandfather of notation, but it is also specific to the instrument you are playing. Tablature will not help you to talk to pianists, horn players, or even drummers. Tablature will not tell you how long to leave your finger on a string, or what to do with it while it’s down there. Tablature just tells you where to put your finger. It is a great graphic aid, but it is not complete within itself. Learn to read the notes. It is much easier than it seems at first.

    Best of luck no matter what you decide and I hope this helps.

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